A Humbling Reminder

My sweet baby girl with her niece.
My sweet baby girl with her niece.

Almost a month ago now,  The Party House had an emergency.  Not the worst emergency ever, but an emergency none the less.  Our daughter, Hilary, is epileptic, and she had a seizure right here at home.  She had been running a few miles on the treadmill in our game room, and Travel Man and I heard this loud clunk, and bang, and we knew something was wrong.  We bolted to the game room simultaneously and found Hilary on the floor in a full on tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure.    Travel Man quickly got her away from the end of the treadmill, I ran to grab the phone to call 9-1-1, and got the treadmill powered off.  Her convulsions probably lasted for 1-2 minutes, but it seemed like forever and a day before they stopped.  At this moment in time a wave of emotions washed over me like a ton of bricks.  The memories of all of the medical procedures and emergencies that we have been through with the kids over the years played like a short, quick movie in my mind.  And I’m thinking, this can’t be happening again. I wrote a few posts about our family’s life story last year, and about how I stopped sweating the small things in life.

This is the first time Hilary had a seizure where she got injured.  She was bleeding a little and we had to locate the source, which was actually her lip. (Required 3 stitches at the ER). We did call 9-1-1 for the paramedics to help us out with getting her vital signs checked out, and transporting her to the Emergency Room.  And I have to tell you all that the 9-1-1 operator who was talking to me was a saint.  She calmly and patiently talked me through what we needed to be checking on Hilary.  The biggest concern was with her breathing and making sure she did not vomit.  This was Hilary’s first seizure in almost 8 years.  It had been such a long time since her last seizure we did not want to take any chances with her having another one on the way to the hospital.

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My sweet baby girl with her boo-boo lip.

Now fast forward to our hospital visit.  My daughter is sitting in the ER bed, her lip swollen and stitched up and all I am thinking is I am ever so thankful she was not in her car when this all happened.  I am  so thankful I am sitting here talking to her, and her only injury is a fat lip,  I can deal with that.  Of course your mind wanders to the “What If’s”, and “What Could Have Happened’s”.  But mine and Travel Man’s thoughts were resting on the fact that Hilary was going to be ok, and we were taking her back home.

All of Hilary’s seizures (I believe she has had 4) have occurred at home.  Ironic isn’t it?  We have been right there to take care of her, and get her through all of them, except one.  The first seizure she had we think happened while she was in the bathroom, and we had no idea anything had happened to her.  She did not take any big falls, and did not remember anything afterward.  She thought she had passed out from being dehydrated or having the flu or something.  The other three seizures were all very sudden, with big falls,  and with no warning whatsoever.  That’s the scariest part of Hilary’s seizures.  She has never had any physical warning that they are about to happen.

So, Hilary has had a very humbling reminder that her meds are ever so important to her well-being.  After this seizure we promptly got her a new med reminder box, and she is diligently back on her med routine.  She realizes now more than ever that the daily meds she takes will not go away anytime soon, and that she will need to take them from here to eternity.

Hilary and I chatted about me writing this post.  She is quite protective of her emotions and feelings, and I would never share this story with all of you without her permission.  Hilary had this to say about her seizure, “I was too forgetful about my meds.  It had been so long since my last seizure that I did not really think about the possibilities.  My epilepsy had been on the back burner.  So, if I forgot my meds I would just shrug it off and take them the next time.  This time, with this seizure was just one too many times.  This was a wake up call that this is for life.”

4 comments

  1. I am just embarking on this road with my 13-yr-old daughter. Just a month ago she had 2 seizures then another one in school two weeks after that….We had her on Keppra when the third one came. She is now on Trileptal. I think she may still need medicines when she is an adult like your daughter. So far she is so good at taking her meds at 6 and 6 … On weekends she wakes herself up with her alarm to take the 6 a.m. Thank you for sharing this story. And thank you Hilary. Don’t forget your meds!!!

    • Thanks for stopping by for a visit Amanda. My best advice to you and your daughter is just take one day at a time. Especially for a teenager. They just want to be “normal”. I have always told my kids they are their own “normal”. They have to take care of themselves, and stay on their meds to stay healthy. And in this day and age we’re so thankful for all the medications and tools they have available to them. We wish you and your family all the best as you go through getting meds adjusted, and for your daughter’s good health. Keep us posted on her progress. We’d love to hear how she’s doing.

  2. sharechair says:

    How frightening. The good news is that you can pinpoint it to being lax with the meds, rather than occurring while being vigilant with the meds. My young neighbor had similar episodes and the biggest impact for her was restrictions on driving. Now that she has been seizure free for 6 months, she is driving again, but that was the most devastating part for her. Hilary- So glad you are well, and that a fat lip is your only souvenir. 🙂

    • We were actually relieved to know the cause of this seizure. With the chronic conditions it’s always the fear of the unknown that can send your emotions into a tailspin. We’re so glad to hear your neighbor is doing well, and driving again. And thanks for your kind wishes for Hilary. So glad to have you stop by for a visit.

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